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Tasmania

Tasmania is a place of wild and beautiful landscapes, friendly, helpful people with a relaxed island lifestyle, wonderful wine and food and a haunting history evoked by spectacular convict-era ruins. It's also Australia's smallest state and the most geographically diverse with over 40 per cent of Tasmania reserved as national park and world heritage area. So no matter where you go in Tasmania, whether you spend time in one location or drive around the island, we know you'll be delighted by what you'll find and surprised at how much bigger Tasmania really is on the inside.

Hobart and South

Hobart, Tasmania's capital city, is located on the Derwent River in Tasmania's south and is within a 90-minute drive of some of Tasmania's most visited attractions, making it the perfect base for exploring southern Tasmania.

South of Hobart are the clear waters and stunning coastline of Bruny Island, the fertile soils of the Huon valley, the picturesque beauty of the D'Entrecasteaux Channel and the rugged Hartz Mountains National Park.

East of Hobart are the wineries of the Coal River Valley and the Tasman National Park with its spectacular coastline and historic convict sites.

East Coast

Tasmania's East Coast, with its natural beauty, spectacular landscapes and long beautiful beaches, offers a completely different Australian coastal experience. Here you'll discover the beaches of the beautiful Bay of Fires, one of Lonely Planet's top 10 regions in the world, along with historic townships, fresh seafood and friendly locals.

Five national parks spread along the coast including the stunning Freycinet National Park with its pink granite mountains, pure white beaches and crystal clear sea.

The two largest towns on the East Coast are Bicheno and St Helens - both busy fishing ports, so expect some of the freshest seafood around. There's also some of the best game fishing in Australia.

And for those interested in diving, there are sheer rock walls, deep fissures, caves, sponges and sea whips, not to mention world-famous kelp forests.

Inland from the coast you'll find temperate rainforests, fresh grown produce and the rich heritage of the boom days of tin mining as well as fruits and berries from orchards and gardens and full-flavoured beef and lamb raised on seaside pastures. With this range of activities and adventures to choose from, it's no wonder the East Coast attracts visitors from around the world.

North West

Full of colour and flavour, Tasmania's North West is the gateway to some of Tasmania's most beautiful natural places. Exploring the North West you'll find classic coastal drives, food trails, stunning national parks and beautiful nature reserves.

Tasmania's North West is a great place for touring and offers spectacular views at every turn, from Mt Roland near Devonport, Table Cape near Wynyard and the famous 'Nut' at Stanley. And some of Tasmania's prettiest cities and towns sit right on the water's edge on the scenic North West coast, each with their own unique attractions and relaxed seaside atmosphere.

There's an ongoing tradition of agriculture in here that's evident in the rich red soils and patchwork fields found throughout the countryside. The ideal growing conditions have inspired growers and makers committed to producing the very best in fresh crisp vegetables, dairy products, wines, whiskey and sweet treats for the hungry traveller – the ultimate paddock to plate experience.

There's a wealth of stories here too, with some great museums and significant Aboriginal heritage sites, while the region's creative spirit is showcased in the many art galleries, public artworks, artisan shops and markets found along the North West coast.

Tasmania's North West is also home to Cradle Mountain, one of Tasmania's most visited icons, offering amazing nature experiences, including forest adventures, great walks - easy and hard - and some of the best scenery in the world.

Whichever way you explore the region, there's no shortage of great places to stay, eat and enjoy in Tasmania's North West.

King Island

King Island lies off the north-west coast of Tasmania, surrounded by rugged coastline and full of fresh seafood, famously good produce and some of the cleanest air in the world.

This is a destination for foodies who want to get close to the source and travel far from the rest of the world.

Uncover the island's stories at the museum and cultural centre in the town of Currie or take a guided or DIY trail of the island's produce, culture, history, flora and fauna.

It's quiet and easy going here, but there's something interesting at every turn – from a lighthouse and offshore shipwrecks to the island's great nature walks and unique wildlife, including the elusive platypus and rare orange-bellied parrots.

Surf's up for serious board riders and kite surfers and divers, with plenty of other ways to work up an appetite before sampling the island's famous cheese and dairy products, seafood, beef, honey and fruit and veggies at a farm gate or eatery.

Catch dinner on a charter boat or pick up a picnic hamper for an alfresco feast, King Island-style. Food is king here, and the island's annual Long Table Festival puts the island's fresh produce front and centre.

King Island is 80 kilometres north-west of mainland Tasmania, accessible by air from Melbourne, Launceston and Burnie–Wynyard.

Launceston and North

Tasmania's North is a feast of historic streetscapes and heritage estates, rich farmland, premier cool-climate wines, fresh produce and a haven for designers and craft makers.

Launceston, in Tasmania's North, is Tasmania's second largest city and a vibrant hub for food and wine, culture and nature. It's also the gateway to the Tamar Valley.

Out of Launceston, the surrounding green fields and country lanes are lined with 150 year old hawthorn, poplar and elm trees, while in the rich farmland of the Tamar Valley can be found lavender plantations, vineyards, strawberry farms and orchards.

The Tamar Valley is also Tasmania's premier wine-growing region and a place where premium cool-climate wines, outstanding fresh produce and award winning restaurants go hand in hand. The cellar doors, vineyard restaurants and farmers' markets of Launceston and the north offer some of the best gourmet experiences in Australia.

This idyllic setting will satisfy other interests too, from those of history enthusiasts to nature lovers.

The nearby towns of Evandale and Longford, with their grand old estates of Woolmers, Brickendon, Panshangar and Clarendon, offer visitors the chance to enjoy the architecture and community spirit of 19th century English villages made relevant for today.

Many are now luxury retreats that offer a uniquely Tasmanian experience, combining old world elegance with a relaxed, new world style.

And for those interested in wildlife, nearby Narawntapu National Park provides many opportunities to see Australia's unique animals.

West Coast

On Tasmania's West Coast you'll find world famous wilderness rich in convict heritage, stunning national parks and historic mining towns.

Gateway to Tasmania's Wilderness World Heritage Area, its rugged mountains, ancient rain forests and heath make the west one of Australia's last true wilderness frontiers. Yet, despite its remoteness, its easy and safe to visit and travellers can still enjoy the best of Tasmania's quality accommodation and fine dining.

Tasmania's west is often remembered for the conflict between forestry workers and environmentalists to save the flooding of Lake Pedder, and once you visit you'll get an idea of what the protest was all about.

The largest coastal town is Strahan, situated on Macquarie Harbour and close to Sarah Island - one of the harshest penal colony settlements in Australia.

The inland population centres of Queenstown and the smaller towns of Zeehan, Tullah and Rosebery are rich in mining history and are all within a short distance of magnificent lakes, rivers, rainforests, giant sand dunes and historic sites.

There are so many ways to experience Tasmania's west, from wild forest adventures to luxury cruises on crystal clear waterways or simply by car.

Visitors can experience its wonders by driving for around 60 km along the Lyell Highway between Derwent Bridge and Lake Burbury. Bordering the highway are a series of stunning short walks through rainforest to Donaghy's Lookout, the Franklin River Nature Trail and the Nelson Falls Nature Trail - all highly recommended.

Flinders Island

Flinders Island is located off mainland Tasmania's north-east coast and offers the ultimate escape with peace and quiet, natural beauty and plenty of local attractions.

Flinders is the largest of the Furneaux group of 52 islands and offers a range of great experiences - from walking beautiful, long deserted beaches and lazy scenic drives to fishing, golfing, diving and even fossicking for 'Killiecrankie diamonds'.

Beyond the green rolling hills of farmland, there's also a world of natural wonders to explore, from the pristine coastline to the rugged pink and grey granite mountain ranges of the Strzelecki National Park, not to mention plants and animals found nowhere else on earth.

Visitors to the island can camp in the wilderness, relax in luxury at a seaside resort or stay at a local farm or friendly Bed and Breakfast.

There's plenty of good quality produce to enjoy with locally grown meats, freshly caught seafood, fresh fruits and vegetables and wines, as well as art and craft made from locally-sourced materials.
Flinders Island is a special place and offers a refreshing break from the real world.

Regular flights to Flinders Island leave from Launceston, Tasmania or Essendon, Victoria. The island can also be reached by ferry from Bridport in Tasmania and Port Welshpool in Victoria.